qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches
qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches
qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches
qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches
qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches
qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches
qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches
qinni:

More tips:
The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 
Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.
I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 
Hope it helps anyways :)
My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches

qinni:

More tips:

  • The closest I could find on Amazon to the watercolour set I use is the Sakura brand of Koi Assorted WaterColours Field Set.
  • Just use any old toothbrush. I used to use the ones that my dentist would give me after a visit, just because those were kind of cheap and I wouldn’t actually use them anyways.
  • I use acrylic for flicking and highlights because watercolour-whites tend to fade when they dry. 
  • Also, remember to keep your hands clean, because nothing’s worse than smudging graphite into your watercolours and then unable to get it out.
  • Try to avoid black and white when possible. They tend to dull the colours and it loses that watercolouring lustre. 

Since I started watercolouring again for my daily sketches, I’ve gotten a lot of asks/dA notes on if I could give a tutorial on watercolouring and also more specific questions that overlapped each other, so I decided to do a semi guide/tips/answering thing.

I actually started watercolouring before I went into digital medium, so I have a bit of personal experience, but I am essentially self-taught when it comes to watercolouring since there weren’t a lot of watercolour tutorials online back then to begin with, so I cannot promise that these are the absolute correct way of doing things. 

Hope it helps anyways :)

My Other Tutorials/Guides | My Daily Sketches

abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings. For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement. The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery
abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings. For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement. The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery
abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings. For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement. The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery
abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings. For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement. The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery
abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings. For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement. The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery
abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings. For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement. The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery

abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings.

For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement.

The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery

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